Fishing in Iceland

Fishing in Iceland

Iceland Responsible Fisheries

There is a wide range of reasons why we’ve decided to import fish just from Iceland. Fisheries that rank among the richest in the world are situated around Iceland. Waters washing the island’s shores are very cold, thanks to which the fish contain much fewer parasites than fish living in southern areas. A clean and healthy environment is exceptionally beneficial to fish, and it also influences the quality and taste of the fish.

Fishing is one of Iceland’s main economic sectors, which reflects not only years of experience and know-how handed down from generation to generation, but also investment into technological development. The export of fish and other seafood currently accounts for 40% of the country’s exports, and cod is the most in demand of all the fish species.

Although fishing is crucial for the country’s economy, the Icelanders also care about an environmentally-friendly approach and the conservation of natural resources for the future, so that coming generations can continue fishing. There are, therefore, set quotas for all fish species to protect natural species from excessive decline in the number of inpiduals as a result of harvesting, which may in the long term lead to their extinction. 

Also, great technological innovations are implemented in fish processing in Iceland. One of the main objectives of responsible fishing, the principles of which govern Icelandic industry, is processing a fish body in such a way as to maximise the use of all its parts. This type of processing respects the responsibility to nature and maximises economic profit at the same time.

Icelandic fish s.r.o. cooperates exclusively with companies whose fishermen go out to sea every day and fish using the longline technique, which employs the traditional principle of catching fish with bait. None of our fish comes from trawlers with trawls that plunder the oceans, and in which fish are crammed together for several days. The results of a recent report of the Nofema research company prove that the flesh of fish caught on a long line is whiter and of a firmer texture, which results from being harvested on the same day and makes it possible to process the fish immediately. In addition to colour and texture, marked differences in both aroma and taste were recorded in fish from trawlers.

Our fish

Atlantic cod

Atlantic cod

Cod live in shoals in colder waters and most often occurs over the continental shelf at a depth of 30-80 metres. They feed on molluscs, crustaceans and small fish.

More
Haddock

Haddock

It is most often found at a depth of 40-130 metres. Similarly to other cod species, it lives in shoals and feeds on fish eggs, worms, molluscs and sometimes also on small fish.

More
Pollock

Pollock

Pollock is a predator feeding mainly on crustaceans, herring and small fish. It lives in shoals and can most frequently be found near the bottom at a depth of about 200 metres.

More
Red fish

Red fish

It lives in shoals and is found at depths of around 100-1,000 metres in areas far from the shore. It feeds on prawns, crustaceans and other fish.

More
Ling

Ling

In adulthood the ling can be found at a depth of 100-200, but it occurs even deeper. They feed on shellfish, cuttlefish and other fish.

More
Blue ling

Blue ling

It lives at depths of around 100-200 metres, but sometimes occurs in areas 600 metres below sea level. Mainly feeds on fish and small sea animals.

More
Monk fish

Monk fish

It is found at depths near the sea bottom. It feeds on rays, eels and other fish species, which it attracts thanks to a luminescent projection on the front part of its dorsal fin.

More
Lemon sole

Lemon sole

The lemon sole is found in areas with a dominating rocky bottom surface, at depths of up to 200 metres. It feeds on various crustacean and mollusc species.

More
Plaice

Plaice

The plaice lives in cold waters near a sandy or muddy sea bottom at depths of around 50-150 metres, where it feeds on worms, crustaceans and small fish.

More
Atlantic salmon

Atlantic salmon

It is found at depths to 200 metres and feeds predominantly on crustaceans and smaller fish.

More
Atlantic catfish

Atlantic catfish

Catfish feed mainly hard-shelled creatures whose body crunches with their sharp teeth. It occurs at depths of 400 m.

More
Green sea urchin

Green sea urchin

It occurs in tidal areas dominated by rocky bottom surface. They feed on seaweed and small marine animals.

More

Contact

Malá ikona

Do you have a question regarding fishing in Iceland? Feel free to contact us through this simple form.

How much is 5+2 by words?